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Compassionate Palliative Care in Westchester, NY

Compassionate Palliative Care in Westchester, NY

Jansen Hospice has been committed to providing compassionate palliative care to Westchester County, NY since 1984

Jansen’s top priority is to ensure every patient has dignity, hope, and peace during treatment of their serious and life-threatening illness. It can be difficult to manage your physical, emotional, and spiritual needs during this time. That’s why we’re committed to providing support in these areas for both the patient and their family.

Hospice care vs. Palliative care

Hospice and palliative care both serve to provide comfort, reduce stress, relieve symptoms, and offer emotional support. Patients who receive these services are facing life-threatening illnesses that may or may not be curable.

Palliative care is the overall term for care during a chronic or life-limiting illness. This may be longer term and involve more medical involvement to cure the illness. Hospice care is a type of palliative care that comes towards the end of a patient’s life. This usually happens when the patient is given weeks to months left with no expectation to cure the illness but instead receives pain management care.

Palliative care in Westchester, NY with Jansen

Our Palliative Care is dedicated to caring for the whole person: body, mind, and spirit.

Jansen works with the palliative care team at New York Presbyterian/Lawrence Hospital and the Lawrence Home Care of Westchester staff to support symptom management for patients. Helping family members is an essential part of our mission, and our exceptional staff and professionally trained volunteers are available when needed most.

There are 5 stages of palliative care:

Stage 1: Early Palliative Care

The first stage of palliative care focuses on advance care planning. You will work with a team of medical, guidance, and therapist professionals who will help determine your long-term needs in order to create a treatment plan and overall long-term schedule.

Stage 2: Treatment Palliative Care

After creating your treatment plan, you begin treatment. Treatment looks different with each patient but may include some combination of medications (treatment and pain management), outside exercise, and counseling. It is recommended that your treatment plan exhibits emotional, spiritual, and medical care to ensure you are as holistically supported as possible.

Stage 3: Transition Palliative Care

Transition care is initiated when the illness has progressed and your treatment is no longer effective. Your care transitions to management which means continuing your treatment plan but adding more pain management and emotional support.

Stage 4: End-of-Life Palliative Care

At this point, you have been diagnosed with only a short amount of time left. Your team is now focused on creating a peaceful and comfortable existence so you can enjoy these moments as much as possible. Treatment is no longer an option so symptom management is necessary. Patients will typically return to the comfort of their home to be surrounded by their loved ones.

Stage 5: Bereavement Palliative Care

Bereavement care focuses on supporting your family and friends in coping with their great loss. The goal is to help your loved ones heal without you. This support can happen before, during, and after their loss.

If you’re looking for palliative care in Westchester, NY, Jansen Hospice & Palliative Care wants to help. Call us at (914) 787-6158 for more information.

Understanding the 5 Stages of Palliative Care: A Guide for Patients and Caregivers

Palliative care is a type of specialized care that is designed to support people with serious illnesses. Its primary goal is to improve their quality of life by managing symptoms and providing emotional, social, and spiritual support.

While many people think of palliative care as end-of-life care, it can actually be provided at any stage of an illness. This article will discuss the five stages of palliative care and what they entail.

Stage 1: Early Palliative Care

A person giving an old man coffeeThe first stage of palliative care focuses on planning. You will create a treatment plan and overall long-term schedule to help you understand what your terminal illness will mean to you. You will create a group of medical, guidance, or therapist professionals who will help determine your long-term needs.

Stage 2: Treatment Palliative Care

After creating a plan for your illness, you start your treatment. Depending on your illness, your treatment will look different per person. You will probably have some combination of medications (treatment and pain management), outside exercise, and counseling. It is recommended that your treatment plan exhibits emotional, spiritual, and medical care to ensure you are as supportive as possible.

Stage 3: Transition Palliative CareA man looking out at the sea

This stage is when your illness becomes very real. You no longer are reacting to your treatment plan, so your care transitions to management. Continuing your treatment plan but adding more pain management and emotional support.

Stage 4: End-of-Life Palliative Care

This stage moves away from treatment as death is imminent. You are now focusing on enjoying life as much as possible while still being comfortable. This is when you start to prepare yourself and your family for what is coming.

Stage 5: Bereavement Palliative Care

This stage is when the illness has taken you. Focusing on support for your family and friends in coping with their great loss. The goal is to help your loved ones heal without you.

Still have questions about the 5 stages of Palliative Care? Contact Jansen Hospice, and we will walk you through everything you need to know!

This place and the workers are truly a blessing. I can never repay them for the help and support that they gave me with my mom. While no other company wanted to take my moms case they were the only ones willing to take it. They stood by me thru all the trials and tribulations and I could’ve never done that transition without them eternally grateful.

— Anasia